A Pear Comparison

First off, I have a confession to make. Pears are not my favourite fruit. Now don’t get me wrong, I don’t hate pears, it’s just that I’ve always found pears to be a bit on the boring side.

Nevertheless, I often buy pears in the winter (because they are affordable) but admittedly they usually end up languishing in my crisper until I shamefully end up throwing them in a smoothie. Let’s just say that pears don’t get me very excited.

However, it’s not everyday that The Fruit Adventurer encounters a new type of pear, so when I came across a package of something called Cold Snap pears yesterday in the grocery store, I was intrigued.

For the first time ever, I found myself excited about a pear!

According to coldsnappear.ca, these pears are a new variety that are exclusively grown and distributed in Canada. They apparently have a long storage life and high resistance to disease, making them an attractive option during Canada’s long winter.

A huge selling point for me is that these fruits are from my home province of Ontario, and they are about as local as fresh fruit is going to get for me in the middle of winter. So I picked up a 6-pack and they have been ripening on my kitchen counter ever since.

This morning, as I walked into the kitchen, I noticed a lovely, floral scent emanating from my basket of Cold Snaps and I knew it was time. The pears were ready.

For compearison purposes I decided to purchase a Bartlett pear as well to truly taste and test the differences between the two. Fortunately, both ripened right around the same time so I could perform this great pear comparison!

First, I took a bite out of the Bartlett pear.

No surprises there, it tasted like your standard pear, with very soft floral flavours and a blandness that has contributed to my pear indifference over the years.

Next up, the Cold Snap pear.

I bit into the snapper, and immediately my mouth was flooded with an intense pear flavour. The Cold Snap was noticeably more acidic than the Bartlett, creating a pleasant tangy sweetness that is absent from any pear I’ve ever tried before. I also noticed a bit of bitterness in its peel that added an interesting finish to the overall flavour experience.

Compared to the Bartlett, the Cold Snap pear also has a much denser flesh and a thicker skin, which I imagine makes it a hardy fruit that can handle difficult Canadian winters.

In my opinion, the Cold Snap pear’s flavour knocks the Bartlett out of the park, and I love that it’s a local fruit that I can enjoy in the middle of winter. Now that I’ve had my first encounter with the Cold Snap, I’ll be making it my pear of choice until summer returns, and I suggest you give it a try if you get the opportunity!